Little Gem and Sprout Salad with Lemon Buttermilk Dressing and Radish Tartines

By | April 16, 2015

Instructions

Lemon Buttermilk Dressing

¼ cup buttermilk

¼ cup Meyer lemon juice

¼ cup sunflower seed oil

¼ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon sugar

Little Gem and Sprout Salad

2 heads little gem lettuce, cut into ⅓-inch strips

1 medium watermelon radish, julienned

2 cups radish sprouts

¾ cup Lemon Buttermilk Dressing

4 common stock flowers, petals separated

Combine the dressing ingredients in a jar or Tupperware with a tight-fitting lid. Shake until thoroughly blended.

In a salad bowl, use tongs or your hands to toss the lettuce, radish and radish sprouts with the dressing until all of the leaves are evenly coated. Garnish with flower petals and serve right away.

Radish Tartines

4 thin slices of hearty whole-grain bread

4 ounces soft, mild goat cheese

1 bunch red radishes, sliced thinly

1 watermelon radish, halved and sliced thinly

1 cup microgreens or sprouts

Spread a generous layer of goat cheese on each slice of bread (1 ounce per slice).

Arrange the radishes on top of the goat cheese in an overlapping pattern, then top each tartine with microgreens.

Recipe Notes:

You can make the salad and tartines up to a day in advance. Wait until just before serving to toss the salad with the dressing.

Enjoy the tartines alongside this salad, as an afternoon snack or sliced into quarters for a beautiful appetizer.

If you cannot find radish sprouts, substitute clover sprouts, watercress or any microgreens. Similarly, any variety of delicate edible flower will work well in place of common stock, such as calendula, violets, pansies, marigolds or nasturtiums.

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